1996-2000 Exhibitions

Adriacn van Ostade: Etchings of Peasant Life in Holland’s Golden Age

February 23–April 21, 1996
This nationally traveling exhibition was organized by the Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia, Athens. The comprehensive exhibition, representing every print Adriaen van Ostade is known to have made, came from a single private collection, that of S. William Pelletier, Ph.D., Alumni Foundation Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of Georgia. This exhibition provided a larger contextual understanding for the two oils by Ostade in the Taft collection. (Catalogue)

The Glory of Russia: Five Centuries of Treasures
June 14–October 20, 1996

Assembled from several private collections, this overview of Russian art included icons, oil paintings, works on paper, furniture and decorative art objects, dating from the 15th century through the early-20th century. This exhibition was attended by more than 19,237 visitors and received more comments in the museum “comment book” than any exhibition to date.

A Christmas in Naples
November 23, 1996–January 5, 1997
A holiday and artistic tradition continued with the exclusive presentation of “A Christmas in Naples,” an 18th-century Neapolitan creche from the collection of Francesa Perez de Olaguer Angelon. The set design and installation was accomplished by Theodore A. Gantz and Robert Dyehouse of Sycamore Street Studios with assistance from Perin Mahler.

Wintertime Celebrations
November 29, 1996–January 12, 1997

As a complement to “A Christmas in Naples,” Wintertime Celebrations explored the Jewish holiday Hanukkah, the African American observance of Kwanzaa, Chinese New Year, the Islamic celebration of Eid al-Fitr, Winter Solstice, the Indian rice harvest festival Pongol, the Hispanic Las Posadas, Santa Lucia Day from Sweden, and more.

Romance and Chivalry: History and Literature Reflected in Early Nineteenth-Century French Painting
December 13, 1996–Februarv 9, 1997
A traveling exhibition organized by Stair Sainty Matthiesen, Inc., New York consisted of a group of 60 French nineteenth-century paintings by masters including J.A.D. Ingres and Eugene Delacroix that were inspired by postclassical literary sources such as Shakespeare, Dante, and Walter Scott. Stories of gallantry, adventure, and romance, evocative settings, and colorful characters populated these works based on modern histories. The museum’s sole portrait by Ingres was placed in a broader context of the artist’s work, and works from the decorative arts collections, such as Limoges enamels bearing the likenesses of famous writers like Ronsard or the nobility, were interpreted in conjunction with the exhibition. Gothic revival decorative arts were also presented. (Catalogue)

Cincinnati Collects 5,000 Years of Chinese Art
February 28–April 20, 1997

This exhibition highlighted the wealth of fine Chinese paintings, ceramics, enamels, jades, bronzes, and furniture collected by Tri-State residents and placed the Taft’s collection of 18th-century porcelains in a broader artistic context.

The Vanishing Frontier: Henry F. Farny, 1847-1916
June 13–October 19, 1997
The Vanishing Frontier commemorated the 150th anniversary of the artist’s birth. The exhibition was composed of 35 works, both oil paintings and gouaches, from local private and public collections. American Indian artifacts typical of those illustrated in Farny’s paintings complemented the display.

A Sense of Place I: Geier Apartments
September 11–October 26, 1997
A Sense of Place II: The Alois Alzheimer Center, Dignity with Compassion
October 30–January 11, 1998
These two small exhibitions featuring selections from photographer Jon Hughes’ A Year in the Life project focused on the everyday lives of people with special needs. In conjunction with this Keystone exhibition, the Taft Museum provided its Please Touch sensory tours for children and adults with disabilities.

A Christmas in Naples
November 21, 1997–January 4, 1998
A holiday and artistic tradition continued with the exclusive presentation of “A Christmas in Naples” an 18th-century Neapolitan creche from the collection of Francesa Perez de Olaguer Angelon. Set design and installation were accomplished by Theodore A. Gantz and Robert Dyehouse of Sycamore Street Studios with assistance from Perin Mahler and Marlene Steele.

Dutch Drawings & Watercolors from the Kharkiv Art Museum
December 12, 1997–February 8, 1998
Cincinnati’s sister city in Ukraine shared 36 Dutch works on paper from the 17th through the 19th centuries. The works in this exhibition presented a timeline of Dutch art through three centuries as well as an overview of both the changes and continuity in artistic style during that period. (Click here to purchase catalogue - limited availability)

Small Paintings from the Taft Collection
January 22–April 19, 1998
This exhibition represented an introduction to the fields of painting that most interested Anna Sinton and Charles Phelps Taft as they built their fine arts collection for the benefit of area artists and residents in the early part of this century. Among the works on view were Adrian van Ostade’s An Old Toper George Morland’s Apple Gatherers of 1791, and Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier’s The Three Friends. Also represented by figure studies or landscapes were Jozef Israels, Willem Maris, Jacob Maris, and Jean-Charles Cazin.

Charles Meryon & Jean-Francois Millet: Etchings of Urban & Rural 19th Century France
February 27–April 26, 1998

This exhibition was organized by the Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. S. William Pellieter. The mid-1800s were a time of turmoil, uprising, and change in France as revolution raged, empires rose and fell, and the economy changed from primarily agrarian to urban and industrial. This duality was captured in the city views of a changing Paris by Charles Meryon and the country scenes of peasant life by Jean-Francois Millet. (Catalogue)

Photographs of Over-the-Rhine by Peggy Crawford
April 30–August 23, 1998
This exhibition consisted of ten photographs, an overview and a detail from each of five buildings in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood.

East Meets West: Chinese Export Art and Design
June 19–October 11, 1998

This exhibition placed the Taft Museum of Art’s collection of Chinese export ceramics of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) into a broader context of materials and expressions, including enamels, silver, paintings, ivory, pewter, and glass. Often including coats of arms or other Western influences, wares made for export offer an interesting sociopolitical comparison to the traditionally decorated wares made for the Chinese domestic market primarily during the 18th century. (Catalogue)

The Sounds of Parisian Nightlife: Prints from the Collection of Ervin Raible and Robert Hoskins
September 4, 1998–January 17, 1999

Heaven and Nature Sing: An Italian Baroque Nativity Scene
November 7, 1998–January 10, 1999

A holiday and artistic tradition continued with the exclusive presentation of an 18th-century Neapolitan creche from the collection of Francesa Perez de Olaguer Angelon. Emphasizing the place of the Christmas miracle in the everyday life of the people, a Neapolitan presepio encompasses characters from all walks of life, each with an individual personality. More than 200 objects fit into the stage, including 75 figurines ranging in size from four to 18 inches, accompanied by carved animals such as dogs, sheep, goats, and cattle and decorative accessories such as silver incense burners, baskets, food, musical instruments, and the gifts carried by the Magi, each a miniature work of art in its own right.

Framing a Century: American Art from the Dicke Collection, 1862-1997
December 11, 1998–February 14, 1999

For two generations, the Dicke family of New Bremen, Ohio, has collected 19th- and 20th-century American paintings, works on paper, sculpture, and decorative arts. This exhibition included more than 40 works of art from this extraordinary private collection as well as several examples of Arts and Crafts furniture and accessories. This exhibition presented an array of styles from the last 135 years of American art, largely comprising portraits, landscapes, and scenes of everyday life ranging from naturalistic to abstract and told the story of American art along the way.

Small Paintings From the Taft Collection
January 29–April 18, 1999

This exhibition represented an introduction to the fields of painting that most interested Anna Sinton and Charles Phelps Taft as they built their fine arts collection for the benefit of area artists and residents in the early part of this century. Among the works on view were Adrian van Ostade’s An Old Toper George Morland’s Apple Gatherers of 1791, and Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier’s The Three Friends. Also represented by figure studies or landscapes were Jozef Israels, Willem Maris, Jacob Maris, and Jean-Charles Cazin.

Rembrandt: Treasures from the Rembrandt House, Amsterdam
April 16–June 13, 1999

The Taft Museum of Art was the only midwestern venue to host this exhibition of works from the collection of the Rembrandt House Museum in Amsterdam, the 17th-century house in which Rembrandt lived and worked during the height of his fame from 1639 until 1660. This was the first time that most of these works left Holland. This exhibition included 82 etchings and two copper plates that gave a thorough representation of Rembrandt’s body of work in printmaking, spanning the years 1628-59.

LaRevue Blanche: Prints from the Collection of Ervin Raible and Robert Hoskins
April 30–August 29, 1999

This exhibition of eleven lithographs focused on the avant-garde illustrations that appeared in La Revue Blanche, the French literary and artistic review, including posters that advertised the publication and illustrations commissioned to accompany articles.

Frank Duveneck (1848-1919): Virtuoso of the Brush
July 16–October 17, 1999
Frank Duveneck, one of the most influential American expatriate realists of the 19th century and best known of Cincinnati’s painters, studied and painted in Munich primarily from 1870 to 1879. This exhibition focused on Duveneck as the leading figure and guiding spirit of America’s Munich School during this time period. The exhibition brought together more than 35 of his works, drawn from regional public and private collections, in a retrospective format.

Small Paintings from the Taft Collection
September 3, 1999–January 17, 2000
This exhibition represented an introduction to the fields of painting that most interested Anna Sinton and Charles Phelps Taft as they built their fine arts collection for the benefit of area artists and residents in the early part of this century. Among the works on view were Adrian van Ostade’s An Old Toper, George Morland’s Apple Gatherers of 1791, and Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier’s The Three Friends. Also represented by figure studies or landscapes were Jozef Israels, Willem Maris, Jacob Maris, and Jean-Charles Cazin.

Heaven and Nature Sing: An Italian Baroque Nativity Scene
November 6, 1999–January 9, 2000

A holiday and artistic tradition continued with the exclusive presentation of an 18th-century Neapolitan creche from the collection of Francesa Perez de Olaguer Angelon. Emphasizing the place of the Christmas miracle in the everyday life of the people, a Neapolitan presepio encompasses characters from all walks of life, each with an individual personality. More than 200 objects fit into the stage, including 75 figurines ranging in size from four to 18 inches, accompanied by carved animals such as dogs, sheep, goats, and cattle and decorative accessories such as silver incense burners, baskets, food, musical instruments, and the gifts carried by the Magi, each a miniature work of art in its own right.

The Etchings and Drypoints of James McNeill Whistler
December 3, 1999–January 23, 2000
Although he is most famous for his portrait of his mother, artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler (American, 1834-1903) is also acknowledged as the finest etcher since Rembrandt. This exhibition included 40 prints by America’s most famous expatriate artist and placed the Museum’s world-renowned oil painting At the Piano (1858-59), in the context of the artist’s graphic career.

Paul Gaugin’s Tahitian Woodcuts: A Tribute to John Warrington
January 28–June 25, 2000

The postimpressionist artist Paul Gauguin (French, 1850-1904) is best known for his distinctive paintings depicting life in the South Seas, particularly Tahiti. He also created 36 woodcut prints during his lifetime, giving the artist a prominent place in the history of the medium by virtue of his revolutionary innovations. The 10 woodcuts on view were created using methods borrowed from lithography. Formerly in the collection of John Warrington, who served on the Museum’s Board of Overseers for many years, these woodcuts from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Warrington Bailey stand as a testament to Mr. Warrington’s superb connoisseurship and support of local institutions.

A Renaissance Treasury: The Flagg Collection of European Decorative Arts and Sculpture
February 11–April 16, 2000

During six decades in the 20th century, Richard and Erna Flagg acquired one of the foremost collections of early European decorative arts in North America. In 1991 they donated more than 100 medieval, Renaissance, and baroque works of art to the Milwaukee Art Museum. On view during this exhibition were 62 secular and sacred works including clocks, tablewares, and vessels, inlaid cabinets, metalwork, jewelry, and religious sculptures, which embody the spirit of the late medieval and Renaissance eras. This exhibition was accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue documenting all 112 objects in the Flagg collection. (Catalogue)

The Great Migration: The Evolution of African American Art, 1790-1945
June 16–October 22, 2000
This exhibition placed the Taft Museum of Art’s murals by Robert S. Duncanson (1821-1872) in the broader context of African American artistic achievements. Forty-nine paintings, sculptures, drawings, watercolors, prints and photographs were borrowed from nineteen public, private, and corporate regional collections. The earliest works were two portraits by Joshua Johnston (about 1765-1830), a free black artist who was active in Baltimore, a city that had over 25,000 free blacks in the early 1800s. The second section of the exhibition examined African-American artists active during the 19th century, before and after the Civil War. The third section of the exhibition examined the American Renaissance that had begun in the 1876 after the Reconstruction period and continued well in the 20th century. (Catalogue)

Architecture Cincinnati: Photographs by Alice Weston
July 7–October 8, 2000

This exhibition was a mini-history of Cincinnati’s nationally significant architectural monuments. Weston documented 17 buildings, from the Taft Museum of Art’s historic Baum-Longworth-Taft House, built around 1820, to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which will be constructed on Cincinnati’s riverfront. This exhibition was presented in two parts. The first documented 19th- and early 20th-century structures and the second part documented buildings from the 20th century.

Small Paintings from the Taft Collection
October 20–June 17, 2000

This exhibition represented an introduction to the fields of painting that most interested Anna Sinton and Charles Phelps Taft as they built their fine arts collection for the benefit of area artists and residents in the early part of this century. Among the works on view were Adrian van Ostade’s An Old Toper, George Morland’s Apple Gatherers of 1791, and Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier’s The Three Friends. Also represented by figure studies or landscapes were Jozef Israels, Willem Maris, Jacob Maris, and Jean-Charles Cazin.

Dressed for the Holidays
November 24, 2000–January 7, 2001
The decades of the Taft’s residency came back to life with the gorgeous table setting by Tiffany & Co. in the Dining Room and traditional interior and exterior holiday decorations from Denis Buttelwerth Florist. Six mannequins provided by Sylvia Reid of the Cincinnati History Museum dressed in costumes of the 1870s to the 1920s were displayed in the upstairs foyer, Dining Room, President’s Room, and Music Room.

Heaven and Earth Seen Within: Song Ceramics from the Barron Collection
December 8, 2000–February 19, 2001

Circulated by the New Orleans Museum of Art from Dr. Robert Barron’s internationally renowned collection of Song dynasty (960-1279) ceramics, this exhibition consisted of 63 ceramics created at major Song kilns. On view in this exhibition were small-scale tea bowls, boxes, jars, pots and dishes made for everyday use by the imperial court and other members of Chinese society 1,000 years ago. The items in this exhibition represented the history of the Song dynasty’s three distinct periods: the Northern Song (960-1127), the Southern Song (1127-1279), and the Jin (1115-1234). (Catalogue)

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