Upcoming Exhibitions

Wild West to Gilded Age: American Treasures from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art
February 6, 2015–May 24, 2015
Fifth Third Gallery
This exhibition has been organized by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

Gifford Beal

Gifford Beal, Sideshow (detail), 1910, oil on canvas. Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Morton to the Preston Morton Collection, 1959.66

Featuring the California museum’s greatest gems, this exhibition offers a compelling overview of the most significant themes in 19th- and 20th-century American art. It showcases 52 paintings and eight sculptures by some of America’s greatest artists. Discover landscapes by Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Cole, and Frederic Church; narrative paintings and street scenes by Winslow Homer, Childe Hassam, and George Wesley Bellows; and portraits and figure paintings by William Merritt Chase and John Singer Sargent. Scenes from the American West highlight Americans’ fascination with the wild and recently conquered frontier.

 

Throughout the run of the special exhibition, everyone who presents their library card at the Taft admissions desk will receive free entry!  

Enduring Spirit: Edward Curtis and the North American Indians
June 12–September 20, 2015
Fifth Third Gallery
This Exhibition has been organized by the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, Minneapolis/Paris/Lausanne, in collaboration with the Taft Museum of Art.

Edward Curtis, Chief Joseph—Nez Perce, 1903, photogravure. Courtesy of the Christopher G. Cardozo Collection

Edward Curtis, Chief Joseph—Nez Perce, 1903, photogravure. Courtesy of the Christopher G. Cardozo Collection

Edward Curtis captured a disappearing world: the living culture of the American Indian. These exquisite photographs, taken from 1900 through 1930, include celebrated, iconic, and previously unknown images that unforgettably present the lives of the indigenous American peoples. The exhibition features several different photographic media, including platinum prints, gelatin silver prints, goldtones, photogravures, and cyanotypes. Curtis treated his subjects with great dignity, and the images still have the power to move us profoundly.

 

 

 

 

Jacob Lawrence’s Paintings of the Hero of Haiti
October 9, 2015–January 17, 2016
Fifth Third Gallery
Courtesy of the Amistad Research Center, New Orleans, LA

Jacob Lawrence, Toussaint L‘Ouverture series, no. 38, “Napoleon’s attempt to restore slavery in Haiti was unsuccessful. Desalines, Chief of the Blacks, defeated LeClercirca. Black men, women, and children took up arms to preserve their freedom” (detail), 1938, gouache on paper. Amistad Research Center,  New Orleans, LA, Gift of the Harmon Foundation, 1982

Jacob Lawrence, Toussaint L‘Ouverture series, no. 38, “Napoleon’s attempt to restore slavery in Haiti was unsuccessful. Desalines, Chief of the Blacks, defeated LeClercirca. Black men, women, and children took up arms to preserve their freedom” (detail), 1938, gouache on paper. Amistad Research Center, New Orleans, LA, Gift of the Harmon Foundation, 1982

Jacob Lawrence’s paintings often tell epic stories from African American history. This exhibition offers the rare opportunity to see one of his most important series in its entirety. The dramatic story of Toussaint L’Ouverture, revered as the founding father of Haiti, is recounted through 41 tempera paintings. Lawrence’s signature style of geometric shapes and expressive colors lends an emotional edge to this sweeping tale. Although it illustrates the horrors of slavery and battle, the series is also a testament to the endurance of the human spirit forged during the struggle for freedom.

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