Upcoming Exhibitions

Elegant Geometry: British and American Mosaic Patchwork Quilts
October 21, 2017–January 21, 2018 | Fifth Third Gallery

For nearly 300 years, quilt makers have created a dazzling range of designs using the versatile mosaic patchwork technique. The 21 quilts in Elegant Geometry highlight the skill, intelligence, and artistry of the women who practiced mosaic patchwork quilting during its early years. Mosaic quilters wrapped and sewed cloth around identically sized, geometrically shaped paper pieces. They then stitched the tiny units together into intricate patterns. The earliest quilts in the exhibition originated in 18th-century England. British colonists brought the technique to the New World, where American women embraced it. American quilts in Elegant Geometry date through the 19th century and were made by women from Eastern and Midwestern states including Kentucky and Ohio.
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Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection
February 17–May 27, 2018 | Fifth Third Gallery

Tiffany Studios, River of Life Window, early 20th century, leaded glass. Photograph by John Faier, Driehaus Museum, 2013

Opulently colored stained glass, intricately patterned surfaces, and inventive metallic frameworks—these and other traits characterize the brilliant creations of Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933). A highly original craftsman and artist, Tiffany took natural forms as the primary inspiration for his lush decorative creations. His aesthetic, reinforced and extended by his team of designers, decisively shaped American tastes from the 1880s through the 1920s.

This exhibition presents more than 60 stunning examples of Tiffany’s decorative genius, including vases, lamps, windows, furniture, and ornamental objects. They include such iconic objects as his stained glass plant-form lamps, iridescent blown-glass vases, and illusionistic landscape windows. The exhibition comes from the Richard H. Driehaus Collection in Chicago, one of the country’s preeminent collections of American and European decorative arts. After the exhibition tour, the objects will return to the recently founded Driehaus Museum, opened in 2008 in a splendidly restored Gilded Age mansion.