Upcoming Exhibitions

 

Treasures of British Painting 1400–2000: The Berger Collection
June 10–October 1, 2017 | Fifth Third Gallery

Thomas Gainsborough (English, 1727–1788), A Coastal Landscape, about 1782–84, oil on canvas. The Berger Collection at the Denver Art Museum, TL-18382

Thomas Gainsborough (English, 1727–1788), A Coastal Landscape, about 1782–84, oil on canvas. The Berger Collection at the Denver Art Museum, TL-18382

Fifty paintings span six centuries in this who’s who of British painting. Highlights from the Berger Collection, housed in the Denver Art Museum, convey the history of British artistic achievement and delight the eye. Beginning with a medieval crucifixion scene and ending with contemporary painting, the exhibition touches on all major eras and genres in between. Captivating portraits show the faces of Tudor royalty, powerful aristocrats, and the rising middle class. Landscapes reveal the importance of the sea, the countryside, and the city to British identity. Compelling paintings of horses underscore the popularity of equestrian sports in Britain. In short, Treasures of British Painting, with its masterpieces by artists including Anthony van Dyck, Benjamin West, Thomas Gainsborough, John Constable, and John Singer Sargent, provides a rich survey of British painting.

Treasures of British Painting 1400–2000: The Berger Collection is organized by the Denver Art Museum. The exhibition is made possible by the Berger Collection Educational Trust.
______________________________________________________________

Elegant Geometry: British and American Mosaic Patchwork Quilts
October 21, 2017–January 21, 2018 | Fifth Third Gallery

For nearly 300 years, quilt makers have created a dazzling range of designs using the versatile mosaic patchwork technique. The 21 quilts in Elegant Geometry highlight the skill, intelligence, and artistry of the women who practiced mosaic patchwork quilting during its early years. Mosaic quilters wrapped and sewed cloth around identically sized, geometrically shaped paper pieces. They then stitched the tiny units together into intricate patterns. The earliest quilts in the exhibition originated in 18th-century England. British colonists brought the technique to the New World, where American women embraced it. American quilts in Elegant Geometry date through the 19th century and were made by women from Eastern and Midwestern states including Kentucky and Ohio.