2015-2017 Exhibitions

Bijoux Parisiens: French Jewelry from the Petit Palais, Paris
February 11— May 14, 2017 | Fifth Third Gallery

5642 3

Lucien Falize (1839-1897), Neo-Renaissance Pendant, about 1880. Gold, diamonds, tourmaline, pearl, and enamel. ©Julien Vidal/ Petit Palais/ Roger-Viollet

Sparkling gems, luxurious materials, elegant designs, and superb craftsmanship distinguish works by the great Parisian jewelry houses. Exploring the intersection of French art, fashion, and history, Bijoux Parisiens presents 75 glorious pieces of jewelry by Cartier, Lalique, Van Cleef & Arpels, and others.

Featuring jewelry from the 17th through the mid-20th centuries, the exhibition traces changing styles from lavish Baroque adornments through stately Neoclassical pieces to modern Art Deco designs. Additional decorative objects, design drawings, and prints illuminate the jewelry’s place and significance within French history and culture. Drawn from the collection of the Petit Palais, one of Paris’s greatest museums, these brilliant creations reflect the work of dozens of talented artists, designers, and entrepreneurs who collaborated to create extraordinary works of art.

__________________________________________________________

Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Bridge, Under Construction, August 4, 1988, gelatin silver contact print, 2013, from original glass plate negative, 1888. Collection of Jeffrey J. McClorey

Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Bridge, Under Construction, August 4, 1988, gelatin silver contact print, 2013, from original glass plate negative, 1888. Collection of Jeffrey J. McClorey

Forgotten Cincinnati: Photographs from the 1880s
November 18, 2016 — March 5, 2017 | Sinton Gallery

In 2013, a private collector rediscovered a trove of large glass-plate negatives. These fragile documents by unidentified photographers constitute a time capsule of late-19th-century Cincinnati. Group portraits reveal the faces of former residents. Street scenes show life in a bustling city and record buildings that no longer exist. Construction views and industrial interiors portray Cincinnati as a developing modern metropolis. The exhibition features twelve recent photographic prints made from the original negatives, as well as examples of the negatives themselves. These astounding images conjure the Queen City’s vibrant past.

Forgotten Cincinnati email web sponsors

__________________________________________________________

Picturing the West: Masterworks of 19th-Century Landscape Photography
October 22, 2016–January 15, 2017 | Fifth Third Gallery

As the population of American settlers on the Western frontier exploded during the second half of the 19th century, so did the development of photography. The public craved images of America’s untamed territory, and intrepid photographers showed them what the rugged land looked like. They captured natural wonders, such as sweeping canyons and plunging waterfalls, and manmade marvels like railways and mining structures as well.

The 41 photographs in Picturing the West can be viewed as documentation, as art, and as promotion. The photographers presented America’s natural splendor in a way that was accepted as scientific and factual, but they also constructed a vision of the West as a land ripe for development, exploitation, tourism and, in some cases, preservation. Several of the photographs record major features of America’s first national parks; the exhibition, in fact, commemorates the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

The photographs are large for that time—most are printed from the approximately 18-by-22-inch glass negatives called “mammoth plates.” All are by noteworthy photographers of the period, included Eadweard Muybridge, William Henry Jackson, and Carleton E. Watkins. Picturing the West provides a unique opportunity to compare different approaches to photographing the grandeur of the American landscape.

Picturing the West email web sponsors

__________________________________________________________

Antique Christmas
November 4, 2016–January 8, 2017

Get into the holiday mood by visiting the Taft’s annual display of antique ornaments, decorations, and toys. Thanks to generous lenders from Cincinnati and beyond, you can escape to a winter wonderland of Christmas past.

This year you will see a miniature log cabin in Christmastime woods; an antique clockwork Santa; an exhibit of early German nutcrackers; antique Christmas feather trees trimmed entirely with delightful red and pink ornaments, and—befitting this national election year— a large-scale tree with old patriotic ornaments in red, blue and white. Festive greenery will deck the halls and exterior of the house, and the Dining Room will be set for the holidays with sparkling china, crystal, and silver.

Click here for the Antique Christmas labels.

Antique Christmas email web sponsors

 

__________________________________________________________

LCO_039_ResizedDressing Downton: Changing Fashion for Changing Times 
July 2–September 25, 2016 | Fifth Third Gallery

One of the most widely watched television dramas in the world, Downton Abbey has won numerous awards, including several for its outstanding costumes. Set on a sprawling English country estate, the series follows the lives of the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants, all fittingly dressed for the period.

Through 36 costumes, as well as accessories and film stills, Dressing Downton explores British fashion between 1912 and the early 1920s, a period of great change bookended by the sinking of the Titanic and the dawn of the Jazz Age. World War I (1914–1918) had a lasting effect on people’s lives and on what they wore. The exhibition shows the progression of women’s fashion from figure-altering corsets and bustles to straighter profiles and shorter skirts. For men, the de rigueur white tie and tails for dinner gave way to the more relaxed dinner jacket with black tie. On Downton Abbey as in history, clothing reveals important information about evolving social and economic classes. The exhibition will also draw connections to Charles Phelps Taft and Anna Sinton Taft, contemporaries of the fictitious Crawleys, who lived in the Taft historic house and assembled the collection that is now the Taft Museum of Art.

Exhibition produced by Exhibits Development Group in cooperation with Cosprop Ltd., London. Downton™ and Downton Abbey®. ©2016 Carnival Film & Television Limited. A Carnival Films/Masterpiece Co-Production. All Rights Reserved.

Haute Couture Sponsor
keybank
Additional financial support provided by The H.B, E.W. and F.R. Luther Charitable Foundation, Fifth Third Bank and Narley L. Haley, Co-Trustees; The Sutphin Family Foundation; John Hauck Foundation, Fifth Third Bank, John W. Hauck, and Narley L. Haley, Co-Trustees; The Frank J. Kloenne and Jacqueline Dawson Kloenne Foundation, Fifth Third Bank and Narley L. Haley, Co-Trustees; and Joel McCray and the Robert S. Duncanson Society.

Exhibition Support Generously Provided By
Ellen and George Rieveschl Endowment
Warrington Exhibition Endowment
Chellgren Family Endowment

Season Funder
ArtsWave

Operating Support
Ohio Arts Council

___________________________________________________________

Daubigny’s Studio Boat: Life on the Seine
January 15 — July 3, 2016
Sinton Gallery

Charles François Daubigny, The Studio on the Boat (detail), 1861, etching, published 1862, Alfred Cadart, Paris. Collection of Sallie R. Wadsworth

Charles François Daubigny, The Studio on the Boat (detail), 1861, etching, published 1862, Alfred Cadart, Paris. Collection of Sallie R. Wadsworth

In conjunction with the landmark exhibition Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape, the Taft Museum of Art is pleased to present Daubigny‘s Studio Boat: Life on the Seine, a series of Daubigny’s etchings on loan from the collection of Sallie R. Wadsworth.

Rivers take center stage in many of Daubigny’s landscape paintings. In 1857, the French artist purchased a 28-foot ferry boat and converted it into a studio and houseboat from which he could observe and paint the river both day and night. Daubigny kept a visual diary of ink and wash drawings of daily life on the studio boat for his friends and family to enjoy. He published a selection of these drawings as etchings in 1862.

This exhibition features all 15 etchings, which reveal the rustic and informal life on his boat. Scenes of fishing, cooking, sleeping, and painting are infused with humor and charm, and suggests aspects of Daubigny’s private life and personality.

______________________________________________________________

Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape
February 20–May 29, 2016
Fifth Third Gallery

Charles François Daubigny is a central figure in the development of 19th-century French landscape painting. He routinely painted outdoors to directly capture qualities of light and atmosphere, launched a floating studio on French waterways that fundamentally changed the way artists could frame their compositions, introduced the subject of spring orchards, and exhibited sketch-like works that critics assailed as “mere impressions.” Daubigny became a mentor, colleague, and friend to the Impressionists.

%%wppa%% %%slide=6%% %%align=center%%

Of the 55 paintings, 40 masterpieces by Daubigny will showcase the full range of the artist’s achievements through four decades. A selection of 15 Impressionist and Post- Impressionist paintings by Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh, and Camille Pissarro reveal Daubigny’s influence.

The exhibition is organized by the Taft Museum of Art in partnership with the Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh, Scotland, and the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and will travel to these two European museums after premiering at the Taft.

Click here to read more about Lynne Ambrosini’s 14-year journey to bring this exhibition to the Taft.

Daubigny sponsors


This exhibition has been organized by the Taft Museum of Art, the Scottish National Gallery in Edinburgh, and the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Foundation Support
Bernard Selz Foundation
Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc.

Individual Support
Rosemary and Frank Bloom
Shannon and Lee Carter
Robert Contin
Linda and Harry Fath
Tim Goldsmith and Mindy Hastie
Lynne Meyers Gordon
Kate and Gerry Greene
Debbie and Bruce Long
Ellen Rieveschl

We also thank the following for their generous financial support:

Betsy and Paul Sittenfeld, Susan and Steve Black, Deborah and Paul Chellgren, Debra and David Hausrath, Kristin and Carl Kalnow, Susan and John Tew, Jane and Jon Votel, John Gunnison-Wiseman, Sylvia and Arnold Ambrosini, Certain Teed Gypsum, Docents of the Taft Museum of Art, Gerald T. and Ann Silvers, Thomas Colville, Barbara and Dr. Kenneth Kreines, Schiller and Bodo European Paintings, Lynne and Steve Vollmer, Ann and Stephen Bjornson, Libby and Kevin Ott, Dr. Diane Babcock, Diane and Bill Carney, Wm. Joel McCray, Andy and Deborah Emont Scott, Sotheby’s, Carolyn and Lowell McCoy, Amy and Scot Perlman, Lynne Ambrosini, and several supporters who wish to remain anonymous. Additional support came from numerous generous friends of the Taft.

________________________________________________________________

Heroism in Paint:  A Master Series by Jacob Lawrence
October 10, 2015–January 17, 2016
Fifth Third Gallery
Courtesy of the Amistad Research Center, New Orleans, LA

Jacob Lawrence’s paintings often tell epic stories from African American history. This exhibition offers the rare opportunity to see one of his most important series in its entirety. The dramatic story of Toussaint L’Ouverture, revered as the founding father of Haiti, is recounted through 41 tempera paintings. Lawrence’s signature style of geometric shapes and expressive colors lends an emotional edge to this sweeping tale. Although it illustrates the horrors of slavery and battle, the series is also a testament to the endurance of the human spirit forged during the struggle for freedom.

Exhibition Support Generously Provided By
Ellen and George Rieveschl Endowment
Warrington Exhibition Endowment
Chellgren Family Endowment

Free Sundays
Western & Southern Financial Group
Friends of the Taft Museum of Art

Season Funder
ArtsWave

Operating Support
Ohio Arts Council

_________________________________________________________

Antique Christmas
November 6, 2015 — January 3, 2016

Read more about the origins of this year’s Antique Christmas displays in this guidebook.

Get into the holiday mood by visiting the Taft’s annual display of antique ornaments, decorations, and toys. Thanks to generous lenders from Cincinnati and beyond, you can escape to a winter wonderland of Christmas past. Among the special offerings this year will be a grouping of toys that Santa might have left in the 1880s; a silver tree twinkling with 19th-century silver ornaments; an unusual Noah’s Ark display from Germany, with some two hundred animals; colorful Italian ornaments made just after World War II; and a Frosty the Snowman display.

Festive greenery will deck the halls and exterior of the house, and the Dining Room will be set for the holidays with sparkling china, crystal, and silver.

_______________________________________________________

Pumpkin Head Girl Web

Antique Halloween
September 18—November 1, 2015
Sinton Gallery

Experience Halloween as earlier generations did when the Taft presents a one-room display of antiques from local collectors during this fun holiday. Ranging in date from 1900 to the 1950s, the objects on view will recall tricks and treats from earlier eras. Lanterns, candle shades, and jack-o-lanterns—all designed to light up the darkness—evoke the nighttime setting of Halloween celebrations. Toys, games, candycups, and room decorations masquerade as black cats, skeletons, witches, and goblins in old-fashioned styles that will take you back years into the past.

_________________________________________________________

Enduring Spirit: Edward Curtis and the North American Indians
June 13–September 20, 2015
Fifth Third Gallery
This Exhibition has been organized by the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, Minneapolis/Paris/Lausanne, in collaboration with the Taft Museum of Art.


Edward Curtis captured a disappearing world: the living culture of the American Indian. These exquisite photographs, taken from 1900 through 1930, include celebrated, iconic, and previously unknown images that unforgettably present the lives of the Native American peoples. The exhibition features several different photographic media, including platinum prints, gelatin silver prints, goldtones, photogravures, and cyanotypes. Curtis treated his subjects with great dignity, and the images still have the power to move us profoundly.

%%wppa%% %%slide=5%% %%align=center%%

Taft Sponsors
FotoFocus
The Frank J. Kloenne and Jacqueline
D. Kloenne Foundation
Florence and Ron Koetters
Digi and Mike Schueler

Exhibition Support Generously Provided By
Ellen and George Rieveschl Endowment
Warrington Exhibition Endowment
Chellgren Family Endowment

Free Sundays
Western & Southern Financial Group
Friends of the Taft Museum of Art

Season Funder
ArtsWave

Operating Support
Ohio Arts Council

_________________________________________________________

From Studio to Carousel: The Whimsical World of Jonathan Queen
May 22- September 6, 2015
Sinton Gallery

Jonathan Queen completes Rapid Run Park in his studio.
Jonathan Queen completes Rapid Run Park in his studio.

Celebrate the opening of Carol Ann’s Carousel with an exhibition of works by Cincinnati artist Jonathan Queen. Cincinnati Parks selected Queen to create 16 original paintings for the carousel, located in Smale Riverfront Park near the Roebling Suspension Bridge in downtown Cincinnati. Each painting features a whimsical animal enjoying one of Cincinnati’s parks, including Lytle Park with a view of the Taft Museum of Art. Known for his realistic paintings of toys, which merge still life with narrative, Queen designed and sculpted 30 original animal characters that he included in the 16 colorful park landscapes. For the carousel, Queen also painted 16 views of Cincinnati architectural landmarks with the assistance of ArtWorks apprentices. This exhibition will feature Queen’s studies for the carousel paintings, clay models for the animals, and other carousel-related works, while revealing the painstaking process that Queen used to complete each painting. Playful, nostalgic, and witty, Queen’s carousel project captures the wonder and joy of experiencing the outdoors in Cincinnati’s beautiful parks.

Sponsor
The LaBoiteaux Family Foundation

Framing Provided By
Miller Gallery

Exhibition Support Generously Provided By
Ellen and George Rieveschl Endowment
Warrington Exhibition Endowment
Chellgren Family Endowment

Free Sundays
Western & Southern Financial Group
Friends of the Taft Museum of Art

Season Funder
ArtsWave

Operating Support
Ohio Arts Council

_________________________________________________________

Wild West to Gilded Age: American Treasures from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art
February 6, 2015–May 24, 2015
Fifth Third Gallery
This exhibition has been organized by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

Gifford Beal, Sideshow, 1910, oil on canvas. Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Morton to the Preston Morton Collection, 1959.66

Gifford Beal, Sideshow, 1910, oil on canvas. Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Morton to the Preston Morton Collection, 1959.66

Featuring the California museum’s greatest gems, this exhibition offers a compelling overview of the most significant themes in 19th- and 20th-century American art. It showcases 52 paintings and eight sculptures by some of America’s greatest artists. Discover landscapes by Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Cole, and Frederic Church; narrative paintings and street scenes by Winslow Homer, Childe Hassam, and George Wesley Bellows; and portraits and figure paintings by William Merritt Chase and John Singer Sargent. Scenes from the American West highlight Americans’ fascination with the wild and recently conquered frontier.

Read the Collection Connection from Portico here.

Exhibition Support Generously Provided By
Ellen and George Rieveschl Endowment
Warrington Exhibition Endowment
Chellgren Family Endowment

Exhibition Sponsor
Lynne Meyers Gordon, M.F.A.

Free Sundays
Western & Southern Financial Group
Friends of the Taft Museum of Art

Season Funder
ArtsWave

Operating Support
Ohio Arts Council

_________________________________________________________

An Eye for the West: Paintings and Sculptures from Local Collections
February 6–May 17, 2015
Sinton Gallery
An Eye for the West features a select group of paintings and sculptures from Cincinnati-area private collection. 

Henry Farny, After the Evening Meal, 1902, gouache. Collection of Steve and Lynne Vollmer

Henry Farny, After the Evening Meal, 1902, gouache. Collection of Steve and Lynne Vollmer

The American West captured the imagination of artists throughout the 19th century, as explorers ventured beyond the Mississippi River and the nation expanded westward. The first artists traveled west in the 1830s, bringing back painting and drawings of the rugged landscape and the people who called the region home. As the century progressed, collectors’ appetites for portrayals of the West and its people only intensified. Popular subjects ranged from romanticized versions of noble American Indians to heroic images of rugged cowboys. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, artists shifted their attention to nostalgic meditations on the frontier.

Exhibition Support Generously Provided By
Ellen and George Rieveschl Endowment

ArtsWave Partner
GE Aviation

sponsors-web-0514-e1400681253263